The Tri-State food culture expanding in Evansville.

Will Kreznick

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — What’s happening to us, Evansville? Our smallish meat-and-potatoes city, which until recently was known as a spot for chain restaurants and deep-fried festival food, has sprouted a reputation as a budding food and dining Mecca. It started slowly, but in recent years our appreciation for adventurous dining and […]

EVANSVILLE, Ind. — What’s happening to us, Evansville?

Our smallish meat-and-potatoes city, which until recently was known as a spot for chain restaurants and deep-fried festival food, has sprouted a reputation as a budding food and dining Mecca.

It started slowly, but in recent years our appreciation for adventurous dining and beverages has exploded, and people are noticing.

Zoe Taylor, formerly the operations manager at Carson’s Brewery, told me she was stunned by the change in food culture when she returned in 2018 after a few years away.

Patricia Saavedra, left, serves a customer their Puerco Caribeño at Gollita Peruvian Cuisine Tuesday evening, April 27, 2021.

“When I moved away, Evansville was very commercialized,” she said. “It was just a big small town. Now, when friends come to visit, you can take them to Haynie’s Corner or go bar hopping on Franklin Street. As a young person, it’s wonderful to see these new small restaurants popping up. We are diversifying, but for our predominantly white population, to have all these different foods and cultures coming in is so exciting.”

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