South Korea issues list of high-calorie, low-nutrition, high-caffeine foods banned from school grounds

Will Kreznick

The East Asian nation has long been known to have some of the strictest regulations in place in the APAC region when it comes to controlling the sales of unhealthy foods high in salt, sugar, fats or caffeine to children, such as a mandatory restriction on the marketing of such […]

The East Asian nation has long been known to have some of the strictest regulations in place in the APAC region when it comes to controlling the sales of unhealthy foods high in salt, sugar, fats or caffeine to children, such as a mandatory restriction on the marketing of such foods to children​.

South Korea’s Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) previously already implemented various measures to prevent the sales of such foods in schools such as designating ‘Children’s Food Safety and Protection Zones’ or Green Food Zones within 200m around a school where such foods were banned, but this new list of almost 3,000 prohibited foods now includes specific products, manufacturer names and nutritional information.

“All schools and retailers in the Children’s Food Safety and Protection Zones are prohibited from selling these high-calorie, low-nutrient, or high-caffeine food and beverage products,”​ said MFDS via official documentation on the ban.

“This list contains a total of 2,916 high-calorie and low-nutrition products which are banned, with the largest categories of affected processed food products being candy (1,101 products) followed by chocolate (234), carbonated drinks (198), instant noodles (193) and snacks (184) – but the ban also includes items such as bread, ice cream, juices as well as cooked foods such as pizza and burgers.”

MFDS’ definition of high-calorie and low-nutrition varies depending on the food category – for instance, snacks with more than 250kcal calories , 4g saturated fat or 17g sugars which have less than 2g protein are banned, whereas hamburgers with over 500kcal and less than 9g protein are banned, but if it has over 00mg sodium then it is banned regardless of protein content.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Next Post

Frozen foods fruits and veggies are a healthy alternative to fresh |

Did you know that March is National Frozen Food Month? We celebrate nutritious and convenient frozen foods — an affordable way to get your daily dose of fruits, vegetables and other important food groups. With so many options to choose from, you are sure to find something to satisfy your […]