Giant Food Now Accepts EBT Payments for Delivery Orders

Will Kreznick

Giant Food Grocer Giant Food has announced that individuals and families using SNAP [Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program] benefits now have the option to pay with an EBT (Electronic Benefits Transfer) card when placing online orders for Giant Pickup and Giant Delivers throughout Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia and Delaware.Giant says the […]

Grocer Giant Food has announced that individuals and families using SNAP [Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program] benefits now have the option to pay with an EBT (Electronic Benefits Transfer) card when placing online orders for Giant Pickup and Giant Delivers throughout Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia and Delaware.
Giant says the new user-friendly experience offers customers the option to add their EBT card to their account on Giantfood.com and begin shopping using their SNAP funds.
While browsing online aisles, SNAP customers can sort products to show eligible items and a “SNAP Eligible” label will appear within the product details.
At checkout, customers can select the “Apply SNAP benefits” option and then select the amount to charge to their EBT card, allowing personalized budgeting throughout the month.
SNAP customers can use their benefits to purchase eligible food and grocery items for online orders but will need to use an alternative preferred credit/debit card or checking account for any items not eligible for SNAP as well as taxes, pickup/delivery fees or driver tips, says the grocer.
Online Giant Pickup orders are subject to a $2.95 fee and Giant Delivers orders are subject to a delivery fee between $7.95 and $9.95.
As always, customers with SNAP benefits are also able to use their EBT card for eligible food and grocery purchases in-store.
“Convenience and value are of great importance at Giant and as online grocery demand continues at an all-time high, we are excited to make shopping more accessible for our SNAP customers on Giantfood.com,” said Gregg Dorazio, director of eCommerce for Giant Food.
“The rollout of online EBT payments further supports our mission to increase access to healthy food and support hunger relief efforts in the communities we serve, especially as food insecurity issues have been further exacerbated by the effects of the pandemic.”
National and local grocers around the country have allowed for customers using SNAP or EBT to pay for their groceries online as consumer trends shift due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Retailers like Walmart, Amazon, Safeway, Aldi and Instacart — a grocery delivery service already enable EBT-paying customers to access grocery delivery.

Photo of Sarafina Wright –Washington Informer Staff Writer

Sarafina Wright –Washington Informer Staff Writer

Sarafina Wright is a staff writer at the Washington Informer where she covers business, community events, education, health and politics. She also serves as the editor-in-chief of the WI Bridge, the Informer’s millennial publication.
A native of Charlotte, North Carolina, she attended Howard University, receiving a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. A proud southern girl, her lineage can be traced to the Gullah people inhabiting the low-country of South Carolina. The history of the Gullah people and the Geechee Dialect can be found on the top floor of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.
In her spare time she enjoys watching either college football or the Food Channel and experimenting with make-up. When she’s not writing professionally she can be found blogging at www.sarafinasaid.com.
E-mail: [email protected]
Social Media Handles: Twitter: @dreamersexpress, Instagram: @Sarafinasaid, Snapchat: @Sarafinasaid


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