Fromagination shares easy wine and cheese pairing tips

Will Kreznick

Looking for some easy wine and cheese pairing tips that will take that food and beverage pairing to the next level? Luckily, Ken Monteleone, the Owner and Head Cheesemonger of Fromagination, has shared some simple ideas that anyone, not just the sommelier or the cheesemonger, can master. Ready to cut […]

Looking for some easy wine and cheese pairing tips that will take that food and beverage pairing to the next level? Luckily, Ken Monteleone, the Owner and Head Cheesemonger of Fromagination, has shared some simple ideas that anyone, not just the sommelier or the cheesemonger, can master. Ready to cut a slice?

While many people subscribe to the idea that you should always enjoy the food and beverage combinations that excite you, sometimes a little guidance can push people in a delicious direction. From discovering a new flavor to being open to new options, this simple guide can take that next cheese plate or even little snack to new flavor heights.

For those unfamiliar, Fromagination is a legendary cheese shop in Madison, Wisconsin. While many people are well-versed in the vastness of Wisconsin Cheese options, this location can help cheese lovers whittle away the rind and slice into a wedge of deliciousness.

Ready to discover some easy wine and cheese pairing tips?

Even though Fromagination is known for its artisan cheeses and creative offerings, Monteleone is keeping this advice straight forward and simple with these wine and pairing tips. While some people can expand on these ideas, the reality is that there is a little taste of art to that pairing perfection.

First, when picking a wine, classic summertime wines, like rose and sauvignon blanc, are often in the glass. Thinking about those wines, the sauvignon blanc can pair well with a variety of cheese, especially European style cheeses, like a gouda or a brick cheese. Similar to the old adage, what grows together, goes together, consider matching the style of cheese with the wine region.

For a rose, the various types of rose wines will pair differently with cheeses. Look at the type of grapes used and the region for the pairing combination. Fruit forward wine are better paired with a baby Swiss, while a more robust rose would be better paired with an aged cheddar.

After picking some cheeses, consider the variety and the amount on the plate. Although appetites can vary, a great rule of thumb is about one ounce of cheese per guests. And, consider three to five different varieties of cheese. From a soft to a hard to even a blue cheese, try to create an arc of flavors on the plate.

Just like there are different styles of cheeses, consider how each cheese is presented on the plate. Even though grandma might like her cheese in cubes, not all cheese should be served in such a uniform manner.

From appreciating the rind to cheese ratio to the shape itself, it all matters. For example, a blue cheese is best in a wedge, yet cheddar is better in a block.

Most importantly with all this wine and cheese pairing perfection, no one wants it to melt in the heat. Warm temperatures are not the best for cheeses. A marble plate can help with keeping temperature more regulated. Just like the dermatologist reminds you to stay out of the sun for a long duration, the cheese doesn’t want to get burned by those scorching temperatures.

Lastly, those amazing wine and cheese pairings need to look enticing. While everyone knows that the food and beverages will taste amazing, it needs to look the part, too.

From adding a little color thanks to fruits and jams to plating a wine soaked cheese to add some vibrancy, the options are many. Even add some edible flowers for an elegant approach.

 

What are your go to wine and cheese pairings? Do you have some tasty suggestions to share?

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