Food deserts are being confronted by residents, officials in Augusta

Will Kreznick

Karen Gordon is growing microgreens in her house. In other gardens at her mother’s house and the Olde Town Community Garden, she’s growing blueberries, strawberries, fruit and nut trees, radishes, sweet potatoes, herbs and edible flowers.  “The way to avoid being in a food desert is to, to create your own food […]

Karen Gordon is growing microgreens in her house. In other gardens at her mother’s house and the Olde Town Community Garden, she’s growing blueberries, strawberries, fruit and nut trees, radishes, sweet potatoes, herbs and edible flowers. 

“The way to avoid being in a food desert is to, to create your own food oasis – whatever that looks like,” she said. “It just takes awareness and education.”

According to the US Department of Agriculture, Augusta is covered with of food deserts – areas with low income and limited access to grocery stores. This is particularly true in south Augusta, where Gordon, along with her colleague Carla Walker, started Grow Augusta to create more local food options. But Augusta is not alone – food deserts cover parts of Athens and Savannah, wind through large portions of Atlanta, and dot rural Georgia. 

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