Friday Five: Fast food, big drinks and littering | Local News

Will Kreznick

There’s all kinds of litter along our roadsides. E.L.K. Initiative photo Each April and September, NCDOT asks volunteers to help remove litter from roadsides. Volunteers from local businesses, schools, non-profits, churches, municipalities, law enforcement and community groups play an important role in keeping North Carolina’s roads clean. “In just two […]



There’s all kinds of litter along our roadsides.




Each April and September, NCDOT asks volunteers to help remove litter from roadsides. Volunteers from local businesses, schools, non-profits, churches, municipalities, law enforcement and community groups play an important role in keeping North Carolina’s roads clean.

“In just two months, NCDOT and our partner organizations have picked up over one million pounds of litter,” says David Harris, State Roadside Engineer. “We need to keep that momentum moving forward. The annual Litter Sweep is a great opportunity to get outdoors with family and friends and work alongside NCDOT to ensure North Carolina remains a beautiful place to live and work.”

Volunteers are provided with clean-up supplies such as trash bags, gloves and safety vests from local NCDOT County Maintenance Yard offices.

Making some progress. Last week we told you more about the E.L.K. Intiative’s success in Kannapolis. It seems there has been progress across North Carolina. NCDOT reports that the agency and its partners have removed 1.18 million pounds of litter since Jan. 1.

As part of its litter removal efforts, N.C. Department of Transportation crews, contractors and volunteers have now collected more than 1 million pounds of litter from roadsides statewide this year.

“We are only just beginning this year’s efforts to clean up and prevent litter on our roadsides,” said state Transportation Secretary Eric Boyette. “But we need everyone’s help. We all are responsible for keeping North Carolina clean and beautiful.”

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